Johanna Householder and Frances Leeming, We did everything adults would do. What went wrong?, double-channel video projection, 2015.

We did everything adults would do. What went wrong?

Johanna Householder , Frances Leeming
MAIN GALLERY
Exhibition runs November 13 2015 - December 12 2015
Opening: November 13 2015: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Curated by: Taryn Sirove
Panel Discussion Saturday Dec 12th, 3-5pm
with Ian Carr-Harris, Dr. Hannah Dyer, moderated by Taryn Sirove

Titled after a misquote commonly attributed to William Golding’s 1954 novel Lord of the Flies, the exhibition, We did everything adults would do. What went wrong? can be understood as a single, collaborative installation by Frances Leeming and Johanna Householder. In a large-scale video projection at the center of the exhibition, the artists consider adult representations of children in conflict in two twentieth century films: Wee Willie Winkie (1937) and Lord of the Flies (1963). Reworking footage from these allegories for expansionist promotions of "civilization," the artists put the two iconic protagonists—Winkie (Shirley Temple) and Piggy (Hugh Edwards)—into dialogue. Householder and Leeming tease out a pattern of similarities across shifting articulations of the original literature, isolating narrative constructions that betray the way we as adults symbolically project our own anxieties and ambitions onto figures of children, in these stories, using Western colonial vocabularies around conflict and war.

BIOGRAPHIES
Johanna Householder has been working at the intersection of popular and unpopular culture in performance, dance, video and intermedia art since the late 1970s. Shaping plundered source material in order to talk back to mass forms, Householder practices her own brand of cultural detournement, often in collaboration with other artists. She recently performed at Performancear o Morir in Chihuahua, at undisclosed territory in Java, and at M:ST in Calgary, AB. She is one of the founders of the 7a*11d International Festival of Performance Art and with Tanya Mars she edited Caught in the Act: an anthology of performance art by Canadian women (YYZ Books, 2005) - and they are currently at work on Volume Two.
Frances Leeming's performance, film and installation projects exploring the relationships between gender, technology and consumerism have been presented in Canada, Quebec, the U.S., Britain, Poland and Italy. Her feminist satire film animations The Orientation Express (1987) and Genetic Admiration (2005) have been showcased via film festivals and television broadcasts. Genetic Admiration is featured in Jackie Stacey's book The Cinematic Life of The Gene (2010). Leeming's performance history includes collaborations with Johanna Householder and Clive Robertson and kinetic installation works include Endeavour (2010) commissioned by the Media Gallery, Concordia University. Frances currently teaches Film and Media Studies at Queen's University, Kingston.
Taryn Sirove is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University, Ottawa. Her writing on the Ontario Censor Wars can be found in Explosion in the Movie Machine: Histories of Toronto Moving Image Culture (Images Festival, LIFT and YYZ Books, 2013). Sirove has completed curatorial projects for such institutions as A Space Gallery and Vtape Distribution Centre, in Toronto, Ontario, and written about media art for such publications as Fuse Magazine and (with Erin Morton) Postscript.

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